Internal Internships

As an extension to the course offerings and seminar series, each graduate student in CREATE–AAP will spend several weeks in the labs of other aerosol research groups at UBC to broaden their practical skill sets beyond their own disciplines. Each student is required to spend at least one internship in another research group. For MSc. and PhD. students the length of the internships must be a minimum of 3 and 4 weeks, respectively. During the internship, typically the student will spend 10–15 hours per week on their own research project. This will ensure that the student’s research is progressing, while still gaining exposure in another research environment. After the internship, the student will compose a report and deliver a short talk in the student seminar series.  This requirement must be completed by the end of the 2-year student funding. All internship forms can be found on the Forms page.

Before the internship begins, a formal Internal Internship Agreement should be filled out and signed by all parties involved.  This form should then be submitted to the CREATE–AAP Program Manager at createaap@chem.ubc.ca.

At the end of the internship, the student completes an internal internship student final report, submits this report to the CREATE–AAP Program Manager at createaap@chem.ubc.ca, and are encouraged to make a short presentation in the student seminar series on the internship.

Below is a list of possible projects for internal internships as well as the associated UBC faculty mentors. If you are interested in one of these internal internships you should contact the mentor directly. Once a project has been confirmed by the mentor and both the mentor and student are in agreement on the project, the student together with the mentor should fill out the formal Internal Internship Agreement.

  • Bertram group: Mass spectrometry of Aerosol particles or Laboratory Studies of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions
  • Signorell group: Spectroscopy and Interaction of Aerosols with Light—Fundamentals for Remote Sensing and Cloud Radiation Interaction
  • Brauer group: Atmospheric Aerosol Health Impacts
  • McKendry group: Multi-scale Transport and Physico-Chemical Characteristics of Aerosols
  • Carlsten group: Controlled Human Exposure to Air Pollutants for the Study of Health Effects
  • Rogak group: Sampling and Detection Methods for Engine Exhaust Aerosols
  • Kandlikar group: Methods and Models for Policy Analysis of Aerosol Impacts on Public Health, the Environment, and Global Climate
  • Dowlatabadi group: Maximizing the Benefits of Policies for Climate Change and Air Quality or Integrated Assessment of Climate Change and Air Quality Science and Public Policy Interventions
  • Austin group: Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in the Single Column Version of the Canadian Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM4) or Satellite/Model Comparisons of Global Cloud and Aerosol Statistics
  • Steyn group: Factors Affecting Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Aerosol Pollution in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

External Internships

An important component of our training program will involve an External Internship. Each student will be offered a several-month rotation with national or international partners. These partners include government agencies, environmental consulting companies, and large international research facilities.

Students will pick external internships that best suit their interests and career paths. The responsibilities of the students are to carry out an internship project, contribute as a team member in the host organization. The responsibilities of the host/partner are to provide space and equipment necessary to complete the internship project and offer direction and mentorship. CREATE–AAP will cover the costs of travel and accommodations for the internship project up to a maximum of $6,000. Through these internships, trainees will be exposed to potential employers as well as participate in collaborative research. 

The External Internships will lead to national and international mobility, which has several advantages. First, through these internships, trainees will be exposed to potential employers as well as participate in collaborative research. The trainees will also gain national and/or international experience. The international mobility associated with the external internships also means that the trainees will have access to research infrastructure that currently is not available in Canada. All internship forms can be found on the Forms page.

Before the internship begins, the student should first pick a UBC faculty mentor to supervisor their external internship. The mentor can be either the student’s thesis supervisor or any of the other CREATE–AAP mentors. Then the student (with help and advice from the mentor) should contact potential partners and discuss possible research projects. Once a research project has been agreed upon, a formal External Internship Agreement should be signed by all parties involved: the partner agency supervisor, the student, and the UBC faculty mentor supervising the external internship. This form should then be submitted to the CREATE–AAP Program Manager.

At the end of the internship, the student and agency supervisor both complete an External Internship Report and Evaluation. These forms are then submitted to the CREATE–AAP Program Manager. The responsibilities of the students are to carry out an internship project, contribute as a team member in the host organization, write a project report and give a seminar to the CREATE–AAP Student Seminar Series.  

Listed below are examples of partners, research projects and UBC external internship faculty mentors. Students (with help and advice from their UBC external internship faculty mentors) are also encouraged to contact other government agencies, environmental consulting companies, and large international research facilities to setup an external internship that best suits their interests and career paths.

Collaborators/Partners External Internship Projects UBC Faculty Mentor
RWDI Air Inc. Air quality consulting related to particulate matter Allan Bertram
Levelton Consultants Ltd. Air quality modeling and assessment Allan Bertram
Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada Single particle soot photometry and aerosol mass spectrometry measurements at several Environment Canada sampling sites Allan Bertram
Pacific and Yukon Region, Environment Canada [1] Sea salt-ozone chemistry in the Lower Fraser Valley (available for the summer of 2012), [2] Aerosols and black carbon at a marine boundary layer site on the west coast of BC, and [3] Examination of metals in aerosols collected during the Burrard Inlet Area Local Air Quality Study (BIALAQS) Allan Bertram
Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis Incorporating aerosol physical and chemical processes into atmospheric models Philip Austin
National Research Council of Canada Development of laser-induced incandescence instruments to measure nonvolatile particulate emissions Ruth Signorell
BC Ministry of Healthy Living and Sports Correlating MSP doctor claims for chronic respiratory illnesses with poor air quality episodes (forest fires/winter inversions) and the AQHI Michael Brauer
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA Microscopy and micro-spectroscopy analysis of environmental particles or cloud formation (droplet and ice nucleation) properties of atmospheric aerosol Allan Bertram
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA Versatile aerosol characterization using synchrotron radiation Ruth Signorell
Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe, Germany Investigation of aerosols under atmospheric conditions with the aerosol chamber facility, AIDA Ruth Signorell
Department of Chemistry, University of Bristol, UK Probing dynamic processes of single aerosol droplets in optical traps Ruth Signorell
Division of Environmental Quality, Resources for the Future, USA Climate and air pollution science and policy assessment and design in the US Hadi Dowlatabadi